“Surrogate” by Amy Irwen (Rosemount, Minnesota, USA)

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“Surrogate” – a collage with asemics – by Amy Irwen (Rosemount, Minnesota, USA)

 

Amy Irwen participated in Asemic Front previously with collabs. Now she has sent a beautiful solo collage with asemic writing which I am thrilled to share. The circular asemics are an excellent structural device as are the text-image relations that make this piece visual poetry as well. Here is a closer look:

 

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And the reverse side:

 

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And the envelope:

 

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Asemic front poster - 3.11-11

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Return of “The Rebecca Type-overs”

7.27.2018 - 6

Asemic Front collab by Rebecca Resinski (Arkansas, USA) & De Villo Sloan (New York, USA)

 

 

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7.27.2018 - 9

 

 

Rebecca DVS 7.26.2018 - 1

 

 

Rebecca dvs 7.26.2018 - 3a

 

 

Rebecca dvs 7.26.2018 - 2

 

 

Rebecca dvs 7.26.2018 - 4

 

 

Rebecca dvs collab 7.25.2018 - 11

Asemic Front collab by Rebecca Resinski (Arkansas, USA) & De Villo Sloan (New York, USA)

 

 

Rebecca 7.24.2018 - 1

 

Collab foundation by Rebecca Resinski

 

 

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Asemic front poster - 3.11-11

Concrete Poetry Artist’s Book by Rebecca Resinski (Conway, Arkansas, USA)

Rebecca book 7.24.2018 - 10 (nice)

Blocks an artist’s book of concrete-visual poetry by Rebecca Resinski (Cuckoo Grey 2017)

 

Rebecca Resinski is an Asemic Front fave, and I am thrilled to be able to share her artist’s book Blocks, a superb collection of traditional concrete poetry released under her Cuckoo Grey publishing imprint.

 

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I emphasize the artist’s book aspect because Blocks is a harmonious melding of form and content on several levels. The book is beautiful to view and transforms the text into something akin to a three-dimensional language structure. The poetry is limited to four panels, but it is the book-as-art-object perspective that makes Blocks a compositional and conceptual triumph. We are compelled to apply a new way of “reading.” Rebecca Resinski reveals concrete poetry is derived from Classicism as much as it is from the revolutionary avant garde with which it is most commonly associated. Blocks is an aesthetic triumph of simplicity, clarity and calm.

 

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At least one strain of concrete poetry (derived from Europe and Latin America) emphasizes the materiality of language in the theory that explicates this unique but persistent form. I believe the success of Resinski’s Blocks is largely based on its materiality, which in this case is tied to the actual book form. The square poem structures (given linearity through a loose alphabet structure) are based more on geometry and numerics  than poetic form – say – the sonnet. They provide cohesion to the physical panels and folds. The usual abstraction of conventional “reading” is replaced by the physical experience of pages, folds, touch, fonts – a needed contrast of presence to the digital age.

DVS

 

Rebecca book 7.24.2018 - 11a

 

 

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Blocks an artist’s book of concrete-visual poetry by Rebecca Resinski (Cuckoo Grey 2017)

 

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Asemic front poster - 3.11-11

Vispo X 3 = Richard Canard (remix), Chris Wells, Rebecca Resinski

 

 

Richard - 7.21.2018 - 3

 

“Homage to John Gayer’s Outgoing” by Richard Canard (Carbondale, Illinois, USA)

 

Richard 7.21.2018 - 11

 

 

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Chris wells 7.23.3018 - 1

Visual poetry by Chris Wells (Columbus, Ohio, USA)

 

 

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“Sunlight through trees on water” by Rebecca Resinski (Conway, Arkansas, USA)

 

 

Asemic front poster - 3.11-11

New Asemic Correspondence by Yayoi S.W. (Kirkland, Washington, USA)

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Asemics by Yayoi S.W. (Kirkland, Washington, USA)

 

Yayoi S.W. is creating wonderful art and sharing it via the Eternal Network. She is receiving rave responses. Because her work is often image-text and/or asemic, she has captured the interest of the vispo and asemics communities as well. I’ve already been thrilled to include her work in the Asemic Front project. Her asemics are becoming, in my estimation, more refined and expressive. I am now happy to have new solo work by Yayoi S.W. to share. For those versed in mail art, you might note that she appears to be part of the Mail Art 365 project, a huge worldwide effort that requires a great deal of discipline.

DVS

 

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Detail of asemic writing by Yayoi S.W.

 

 

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Asemic visual poetry by Yayoi S.W.

 

 

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Asemic front poster - 3.11-11

Asemic vispo collabs by Tiina Kainulainen (Helsinki, Finland) & De Villo Sloan (Auburn, New York, USA)

Tiina dvs 7.17.2018 - 1a

Collab by Tiina Kainulainen (Helsinki, Finland) & De Villo Sloan (Auburn, New York, USA)

 

 

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Collab foundation by Tiina Kainulainen

 

 

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Collab by Tiina Kainulainen & De Villo Sloan

 

 

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Collab by Tiina Kainulainen & De Villo Sloan

 

 

Asemic front poster - 3.11-11

Asemics & Chaos Theory by Ruud Janssen (Breda, Netherlands)

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Mail art by Ruud Janssen (Breda, Netherlands)

 

Ruud Janssen – already a contributor to the Asemic Front project – sent this fascinating correspondence art package. A main preoccupation of the piece is exploring asemics and the way signs and symbols are expressed through various modes. These range from “obsolete technologies” to the digital realm and are all addressed in this multi-faceted work.

Ruud Janssen devotes one of his well-known, hand-painted envelopes to establish the themes. I believe this is the first of his painted envelopes that purposefully uses asemic writing. Here is the reverse side of the envelope:

 

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The envelope contains a copy of a letter that reflects on the experience of using a typewriter in the Digital Age and the ironies of snail mailing a letter when email is available. Ruud Janssen addresses ideas concerning copies vs. “authentic” texts, a subject of perennial interest to artists on the conceptual side of things. For me, this “letter” works as a conceptual essay (of significance I would add) that encompasses numerous topics including the current status of traditional mail art. I believe Diane Keys (Elgin, Illinois, USA) also received a copy of this piece:

 

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The reverse side:

 

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This piece was also included:

 

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Mail art by Ruud Janssen (Breda, Netherlands)

 

 

Ruud - 6.26.2018 - 6a

 

On the envelope (top scan), Ruud Janssen asks about a connection between asemic writing and Chaos Theory. I wager he knows more about Chaos Theory than I do. I do know that current asemic writers are discussing randomness, formlessness and even discoveries of physics proper (areas I associate with Chaos Theory) as tools to generate asemic signs, symbols and structures. Various kinds of computer randomness generators could be used to generate asemics. But I am not sure if this is what Ruud Janssen is asking. As Gertrude Stein said, “What was the question?”

DVS

 

Asemic front poster - 3.11-11