Collabs by Amy Irwen (Rosemount, Minnesota, USA) & David Stanley Aponte (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA)

Collabs by Amy Irwen (Minnesota, USA) and David Stanley Aponte (Pennsylvania, USA)

I am thrilled to be able to share these scans of mail art collabs by Amy Irwen and David Stanley Aponte (aka Subreal Alchemy). Amy and David have combined traditional concrete poetry, visual poetry and asemics to create these highly original and – in my estimation – breathtaking works. I hope we can look forward to more by this team!

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Asemic Visual Poetry Collabs by Eduardo Cardoso (Portugal) & De Villo Sloan (USA)

Asemic vispo collab by Eduardo Cardoso (Sines, Portugal) and De Villo Sloan (Auburn, New York, USA)

 

Closer in:

 

 

Reverse:

 

 

Asemic vispo collab by Eduardo Cardoso (Sines, Portugal) & De Villo Sloan (Auburn, New York, USA)

 

 

 

 

Asemics & Letter-Essay by Dave Araki (New York City, USA)

Asemics by Dave Araki (New York City)

 

This is Dave Araki’s second appearance on Asemic Front. I am thrilled to be able to share this wonderful work as well as his thoughtful writing. I plan to send him a letter in response that will go into more depth than this brief commentary. I believe the most important function of this AF post is for the audience to see and read Dave Araki’s work.

https://asemicfront.wordpress.com/2017/04/22/found-asemics-by-dave-araki-new-york-city-usa/

Asemic Front is also (in addition to art) a place for writing (theory especially) about asemics. Dave Araki’s thoughts on asemics are, I believe, very insightful and should be of great interest to readers.

Dave Araki’s art has a conceptual aspect and he does remarkable things with found material. Those of us in the Eternal Network (mail art) are fortunate indeed to be learning about his work through his participation in the international network. In fact, some exciting new artists are emerging in New York City above and beyond the NY Correspondance School-type stalwarts whom we have come to know and admire. Due to Ray Johnson and Fluxus, New York City was for a long time the unofficial capitol of correspondence art. The tradition continues with new generations.

Dave Araki’s discovery of the network is beneficial to him as well. As you can read in his letter-essay to follow, the current interest in asemic writing and working with distressed found textual material (named Trashpo by visual poet Jim Leftwich) prevalent in the network has an affinity to Dave Araki’s interests. He brings exciting work and fresh vision to the expanding asemic movement in particular. Hopefully, he will discover the work of artists across the globe who are working in the same areas.

Here is the reverse side of the opening scan that has interesting material as well:

And the letter-essay:

I appreciate Dave Araki’s praise for the Karnival of Trash, an international call and exhibition emphasizing Trashpo. Over a decade, there have been a number of significant Trashpo events in the network. The KoT is just a recent manifestation that proved to be great fun. DKult is a group within Trashpo similar to a Ray Johnson fan club as well as the Church of the SubGenius (related to Neoism). In truth, Trashpo is – in my view – a manifestation of the Fluxus impulse that is still vital in the mail art community and which has gone through its own, sometimes peculiar, evolution out of the mainstream.

 

Chris Wells Typed-Over by De Villo Sloan (Ohio and New York, USA)

Chris Wells (Columbus, Ohio, USA) typed over by De Villo Sloan (Auburn, New York, USA)

 

Chris Wells posted two visual poems, deeply rooted in concrete poetry, at the IUOMA, which I have appropriated guerilla-style for Asemic Front type-overs. These exercise were great fun, and I hope you enjoy them too.

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Original vispo foundation by Chris Wells (2017)

Chris Wells typed-over by De Villo Sloan

Original vispo foundation by Chris Wells (2017)

Chris Wells typed-over by De Villo Sloan

 

Asemic Remix by Brent Nathan Bechtel (Taylors, South Carolina, USA)

By Brent Nathan Bechtel (Taylors, South Carolina, USA) (2014/2017)

 

Brent Nathan Bechtel is becoming an Asemic Front regular with his innovative and evolving asemic-visual poetry pieces.

I am very pleased to share this work that, Brent reports, is a first foray into what is called at AF a hard copy-digital synthesis piece, combining traditional collage and calligraphy with digital effects. With more digital manipulation than we have seen in the past, Brent Nathan Bechtel has brought increased depth and texture to the work.

I refer to this as a re-mix because, according to Brent, the foundation of the composition was created in 2014. (He clearly had a good run of asemic pieces during that year.) Additional material was recently added and then the digital enhancement. A breakthrough and a stunning piece!

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“Caligrafia” & More Asemic Visual Poetry by Laura Ortiz (Toronto, Ontario, Canada)

“Ancient Knowledge” by Laura Ortiz (Toronto, Canada)

 

Laura Ortiz is producing spectacular visual-textual compositions. She is already highly regarded in the asemic writing community. You can find her work at venues including Michael Jacobson’s New Post-literate and the venerable asemic.net. I am thrilled to share this selection of her work at Asemic Front and look forward to the possibility of posting more of her work in the future.

“Online Caligrafia” by Laura Ortiz

I associate Laura Ortiz with a group – such as Anneke Baeten, Lucinda Sherlock and Kerri Pullo – whom I believe are essentially defining and leading the thriving asemic movement at this time. This contention, however, is limiting. While Laura Ortiz shares commonalities with other artists that seems gender-based and grounded in shared influences, it is her individuality that – I think – makes her work so compelling.

“Untitled” by Laura Ortiz

I wanted to learn more about Laura Ortiz and her work. So I asked her to respond to some questions for Asemic Front. Laura wrote:

“I developed my love for letters from a very young age and always wanted to work in the art field. My father was in advertising. He designed and painted the big billboards that were so central to advertising but which are less common today.

“While I lived in Argentina I studied and worked as a psychologist. When i came to Canada 10 years ago, I decided to follow my heart and in 2007  embarked on a degree in graphic design.

“In 2016 i discovered asemic writing on the web. I became  immediately fascinated by the combination of letters, glyphs, abstract art and design. So I said to myself, ‘Why not!?’ I started exploring, practicing and learning from my fellow artists and I have never stopped since.”

“Slide Show” by Laura Ortiz

I admire Laura Ortiz’s harmonious union of text and image (with an especially brilliant use of color). So I am not surprised to find her lifelong connection to graphic design and advertising going back to her father. (Many asemic writers have studied psychology too.) Her work, however, is also deeply rooted in the practice of calligraphy. These pieces reveal some FAB calligraphy.

While calligraphy is one of her foundations, Laura Ortiz draws on virtually all the conventional sources of asemics such as collage, abstract art and digital aesthetics. (She does not seem particularly partial to found material.) Laura Ortiz brings them together seamlessly and with seemingly infinite variation.

Like much of the asemic writing with which I am most familiar – the type that has emerged in recent years from the mail art network – Laura Ortiz combines both asemics and visual poetry to make her unique compositions. (Laura is not a member of the Eternal Network. She just shares some points in common.) Some asemic purists – I used to call them the “Asemically Correct” – disparage a wedding of asemic writing and visual poetry, although it would seem this position is fading. Laura Ortiz represents a new line of asemic thought.

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“Secrets”

“Water”

“Yellow” by Laura Ortiz