Collab by Nancy Bell Scott – De Villo Sloan + NBS Solo Work & Ephemera

Visual-textual collab (version #1) by Nancy Bell Scott (Maine, USA) & De Villo Sloan (New York, USA)

 

Mail correspondence with Nancy Bell Scott concerning Asemic Front inspired me to attempt a collab piece based on material from the most recent package she sent me, including an amazing peice of paint-spattered wax paper. Most of the NBS solo work haa been previously posted at AF and elsewhere, but I think they are relevant. Furthermore, we have many new visitors, some of whom might not be familiar with the work of Nancy Bell Scott.

 

Painted-spattered wax paper included in envelope of asemic writing by Nancy Bell Scott (Maine, USA)

 

Digital re-composition for NBS-DVS collab

 

“Looking for Home” (2017) by Nancy Bell Scott (remix)

 

Visual-textual collab (version #2) by Nancy Bell Scott (Maine, USA) & De Villo Sloan (New York, USA)

 

“Asemic Legend” by Nancy Bell Scott (2017) (remix)

 

By Nancy Bell Scott (2017) (remix)

 

 

 

Five works by Federico Federici (Berlin, Germany)

By Federico Federici (Berlin, Germany) (June 2017)

 

I am very pleased to be able to share work by Federico Federici on Asemic Front. I believe he is an innovative visual poet and asemic writer. His photography is often text-centered as well and conveys an asemic sensibility, a way of perceiving the world. These first two works are of great interest to me especially because they combine concrete poetry (aka typewriter art) with asemics. The blending is very natural and seamless. While of course these works are highly original, I see the William S. Burroughs-Brion Gysin lineage in them.

 

By Federico Federici (June 2017)

 

By Federico Federici (December 2016)

 

By Federico Federici (Berlin, Germany) (December 2016)

 

By Federico Federici (December 2015)

 

Eco-Asemics – Written in Stone

 

Eco-Asemics in Moravia, New York, USA

 

During the Asemics 16 collaborative book project several years ago, participants discussed many different ideas about asemic writing online. In particular, many pictures of natural phenomenon were posted that suggested language and textuality. They were presented to help define a shared concept of asemics. Either little or no human intervention was involved in these asemic finds, other than the artists seeing the texts/and symbols in nature, a use of imagination.

 

 

This type of asemics became so prevalent and interesting in our discussions that they were named: Eco-Asemics. As in this post, the primary means of sharing Eco-Asemics is through photography and video. Certainly other possibilities exist. Eco-Asemics are inherently Found Asemics; however, Found Asemics frequently involve human activity and even human desecration of nature.

 

 

Eco-Asemics examines nature and natural processes as removed from the impact of “civilization” as much as is possible. Thus, Eco-Asemics explores the archaic roots of language, symbols and written text as it surely connects to human contact with nature. I construct this definition based on the path followed by artists and writers who become more and more involved in Eco-Asemics. They are drawn often – certainly not always though – toward a reverence for and communion with nature. Many who investigate Eco-Asemics have said they gain insight into the primal origins of language and sign-making. They experience can have a profound impact upon their work.

 

 

Note the human presence in this pic:

 

 

 

 

 

Eco-Asemics - 6.8.2017 - 4a

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Numerical Asemic Frontier by Jay Block (Bridgewater, Massachusetts, USA)

By Jay Block (Bridgewater, Massachusetts, USA)

 

I can never decide if Jay Block is a pure materialist or a conceptualist. (I have the same problem with Fluxus generally.) I do know Jay Block is very thoughtful so I try to identify an orientation. This piece suggests to me the largely unexplored land of numbers and asemics. I am not exactly sure what that land is or could be, but Jay exposes a shaft of light from it. (I bet the late Bob Grumman would revel in the possibilities.)

Some asemic writers are using numbers (and decomposed numbers) in their works None that I know of have used mathematical sequences (including random number sequences) to build asemic structures. Great work remains ahead.

 

 

 

Deconstructive Asemics by Wendy Rodgers (Maryland, USA) & Richard Canard (Illinois, USA)

WAR - 5.29.2017 - 7

Asemics by Wendy A. Rodgers (Maryland, USA)

 

The art of Wendy A. Rodgers is known primarily through the Eternal Network, and she has garnered many admirers.  I have written about her work before, focusing on pieces that integrate the decomposition of material “art” and the process of decay. This recent piece, in the form of a large postcard, is more text-centered than previous work. Essentially, I believe Wendy A. Rodgers has presented a brilliant variant on my concept of “Deconstructive Asemics” that was explained early in Asemic Front:

https://asemicfront.wordpress.com/2017/04/01/deconstructive-asemics-by-ficus-strangulensis-west-virginia-usa/

 

WAR - 5.29.2017 - 6

 

I will not speculate about how Wendy Rodgers achieves decomposition in her work. This is not, strictly speaking, Gustav Metzger’s Auto-Destructive Art. Instead, I have compared Wendy Rodgers’ work to the aesthetics of Japanese Gutai; Gutai is well-known in the Eternal Network. Rodgers arrests or suspends the process of decay so that we may contemplate it.

The piece being displayed here functions on a tactile as well as visual level. It has raised contours and appears to be extremely weathered and distressed. As a result, the text has become distorted. That is the center of asemic interest. The art, though, is not crumbling to bits. Here is a view of one side of the card:

 

WAR - 5.29.2017 - 1

 

Here are some detail shots that more clearly reveal the textual distortion through the literal decomposition of the text:

 

WAR - 5.29.2017 - 2

 

WAR - 5.29.2017 - 3

 

WAR - 5.29.2017 - 4

 

Veteran mail artist Richard Canard produces an impressive amount of visual poetry, poetry and asemics. I have also previously written that while Richard Canard is currently recognized as an authentic practitioner of the styles and sensibilities of Ray Johnson’s New York Correspondance School, Canard’s post-avant literary contributions should not be overlooked. I will close with a wonderful example of decomposition by Richard Canard that complements Wendy Rodgers:

 

Richard - 5.23.2017 - 1

Asemics by Richard Canard (Illinois, USA)

 

Richard - 5.23.2017 - 2

 

DVS

 

3.9.2017 - asemic front21